10 things to be thankful for as a qualitative researcher

In the midst of being too busy, sometimes it’s useful to relax, and take a few minutes to think about the things for which we are thankful. Here are a few things that I’m thankful for as a qualitative researcher.

What about you?  Continue reading “10 things to be thankful for as a qualitative researcher”

Recently published qualitative studies to read

It is always a challenge to decide what books to use when I teach. There are so many to choose from! This is a good problem to have though, and I’m grateful to all those researchers out there who are providing examples of diverse approaches to qualitative inquiry that I can share with my students. Here, I’ll give a brief snapshot of four recently published qualitative studies that I’m using in teaching this semester. Continue reading “Recently published qualitative studies to read”

Online information session: Qualitative Research@UGA

The faculty in the Qualitative Research Program at the University of Georgia will host an online session on Thursday October 5, 12:00-1:00 pm EST for prospective students.

Information will be provided about

  • the graduate certificate in Interdisciplinary Qualitative Studies, and
  • the Ph.D. in Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methodologies.

To join the meeting, please click on the following LINK.

Kathy Roulston

Program Coordinator, Qualitative Research Program

University of Georgia

Moral philosophy and the qualitative researcher

“What’s moral philosophy got to do with me?” you might ask. In fact, various forms of moral philosophy underlie how scientific research is routinely practiced. Let’s look at three moral philosophies, and how they might be used to inform ethical decision-making in the conduct of research. Of course, there are many more approaches to moral philosophy, and the descriptions below are somewhat simplified. For more introductions to moral philosophy see Birsch (2014), Rachels and Rachels (2015), and Vaughn (2015).  Continue reading “Moral philosophy and the qualitative researcher”

Visiting the archives

Recently I had the good fortune to visit the National Archives and Library of Congress in Washington DC. Both the National Archives and Library Congress house significant collections of archival materials. For anyone interested in examining historical records pertaining to a topic of interest, a visit to these collections is highly recommended. Continue reading “Visiting the archives”

Tips for new assistant professors

In the United States, as we enter the new academic year, many new assistant professors are beginning a new position. Congratulations to all those who are beginning in new positions in 2017! This is a wonderful accomplishment. The first semester in a new position is filled with new faculty orientations, preparation for teaching new courses, and thinking through ideas and plans for converting doctoral research into publications. With so many responsibilities, it is possible to overlook the larger picture in terms of planning a career. What are some strategies that might help?

Continue reading “Tips for new assistant professors”

“Qualitative researchers need to be storytellers”

This is what Harry Wolcott (1994, p. 17) asserts in his book on qualitative data analysis. What are strategies that one might use to tell the story of one’s research? Whatever approach one selects to use in a qualitative study, the end product will typically be a written report on the research study. This might take the form of an article, chapter or book. Of course there are numerous other ways to present one’s findings, including drama, poetry and performances – that is a topic for another post. Continue reading ““Qualitative researchers need to be storytellers””

An introduction to Creative Analytic Practices and Arts Based Inquiry

“Creative analytic practices” (CAP) is a term coined by the sociologist, Laurel Richardson (1999, p. 660), who writes:

In the wake of poststructuralist, feminist, critical race literary and queer theory, ethnographic work now appears in multiple venues in a variety of forms. The ethnographic genre has been blurred, enlarged, and altered to include autoethnography, poetry, drama, conversation, new journalism, readers’ theater, performance, hypertext, fiction, faction, creative nonfiction, true fiction, aphorisms, comedy, satire, layered texts, writing stories, songs, museum installations, photographs, body painting, choreography and so forth. Continue reading “An introduction to Creative Analytic Practices and Arts Based Inquiry”

Approaches to examine storytelling

Researchers who use narrative inquiry focus on telling the stories of the participants of their studies. There are so many different approaches to narrative inquiry though — how might one begin?

What is meant by the term “narrative”? That depends on the perspective to narrative that one takes. Some argue that narrative data can include open-ended survey data, through interview data, to written narratives. From this perspective, “narrative” is being used synonymously with “words” or “textual data”. Others argue that narratives are stories that have a beginning, middle and an end. That is, narratives are stories that involve a plot with temporal order. Continue reading “Approaches to examine storytelling”