Translating academic writing into trade books

Academic writers typically orient their writing to readers like themselves: other academics used to the jargon associated with any particular discipline. Yet some scholars manage to traverse the divide between the ivory tower and the general public and produce readable, enjoyable, and educational explanations of their topics of interest in the form of trade books. … Continue reading Translating academic writing into trade books

A writer’s guide to getting trim

Helen Sword’s (2007) book The writer’s diet: A guide to fit prose was published for an international audience in 2016. Sword (2016) uses healthy nutrition and fitness as a metaphor to help academic writers improve their prose. Rather than produce heart attack-inducing writing, Sword surveys academics’ language use with the aim of encouraging “fit prose.” … Continue reading A writer’s guide to getting trim

On developing stylish academic writing

Every now and again, you come across a book that you wish you had read years ago. Stylish academic writing by a literary scholar and poet, Helen Sword (2012), is one of these. I really wish I had read this when I first went to college. This book would have saved me much heartache, although … Continue reading On developing stylish academic writing

Doing ethnography in a war zone

This semester, I'm using Doctors at War: Life and Death in a Field Hospital, authored by Mark de Rond in a class I am teaching. De Rond is a professor of Organizational Ethnography in the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge in the UK. One of the topics that he examines is how people … Continue reading Doing ethnography in a war zone

Recently published qualitative studies

This semester I’m using several recently published studies with one of my classes. Here are two, both of which discuss “whiteness” and “white privilege”, albeit from different perspectives and in different contexts. Timothy Lensmire’s book, White folks: Race and identity in rural America (Lensmire, 2017) explores whiteness through in-depth qualitative interviews that the author conducted … Continue reading Recently published qualitative studies

Exploring arts-based research

It has already been a decade since Gary Knowles and Ardra Cole’s (2008) edited handbook of the arts in qualitative research was published. Patricia Leavy’s Handbook of Arts-Based Research (2018), published by Guildford Press, provides an updated overview of the incredible variety of arts-based research currently undertaken. The Handbook of Arts-Based Research adds to Leavy’s prolific output, … Continue reading Exploring arts-based research

Recently published: The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research

The 5th edition of Norman K. Denzin and Yvonna S. Lincoln’s (2018) edited volume, The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research was published earlier this year. I’ve now had a chance to look over a volume and compare it to the previous editions sitting on my book shelf. I recall consulting the first edition of the … Continue reading Recently published: The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research

Summer reading: Ethnography and power

Timothy Pachirat’s (2018) book, Among wolves: Ethnography and the immersive study of power, is one of a series edited by Dvora Yanow and Pergrine Schwartz-Shea. As stated by the editors, the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods focuses on interpretive methodology, and engages with three concerns: (1) methodological issues, (2) approaches and methods, and (3) applications … Continue reading Summer reading: Ethnography and power