Summer reading: Ethnography and power

Timothy Pachirat’s (2018) book, Among wolves: Ethnography and the immersive study of power, is one of a series edited by Dvora Yanow and Pergrine Schwartz-Shea. As stated by the editors, the Routledge Series on Interpretive Methods focuses on interpretive methodology, and engages with three concerns: (1) methodological issues, (2) approaches and methods, and (3) applications … Continue reading Summer reading: Ethnography and power

Influential qualitative researchers: Laurel Richardson

Sociologist Laurel Richardson is well-known for her writing about writing. In numerous texts, she provides plenty for students of qualitative research to think about (Richardson, 1990; Richardson, 1994b; Richardson & St. Pierre, 2005), along with practical suggestions for how writing is a “method of inquiry.” Richardson also proposes the use of “creative analytic practices” or … Continue reading Influential qualitative researchers: Laurel Richardson

Influential qualitative researchers: Harry F. Wolcott

Educational anthropologist Harry Wolcott (1929-2012) has written numerous books on how to do qualitative research. His early study investigated the work of a principal in The man in the principal’s office: An ethnography (Wolcott, 1973). Unlike many of his contemporaries, Wolcott argued for the merit of an n of 1 (Wolcott, 1995). One of his … Continue reading Influential qualitative researchers: Harry F. Wolcott

Variations in doing ethnographic research

Qualitative researchers have innovated with ethnographic methods in numerous ways. In this blogpost, Kathy Roulston and Kathleen deMarrais discuss some examples of variations on traditional ethnographies. Traditional ethnographies call for researchers to spend extensive periods of time in a field setting getting to know people and learning about others’ experiences and cultures. Participation is crucial … Continue reading Variations in doing ethnographic research